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Mississippi

Focus on Diabetes:

Disparities in Treatment: By Income

The map below shows whether the gap in the rate of HbA1c testing among people with diabetes with low income compared to high income within a State is worse than, similar to, or better than the gap that exists across all States with data. The bar chart shows the actual percentage of people with diabetes by income who receive HbA1c monitoring in the State (if available), in the region, and in all States.


For 2007-2009, The Gap in HbA1c Testing for People with Diabetes and Low-Income (under $15,000) Compared to High-Income ($50,000 or more).

For 2007-2009, The Gap in HbA1c Testing for People with Diabetes and Low-Income (under $15,000) Compared to High-Income ($50,000 or more).The gap between low- and high-income groups is worse (red), similar (yellow), or better (green) than the all-State gap. Unknown or insufficient data is represented by no color.


HbA1c monitoring uses a blood test that indicates to a health care provider how well a patient's diabetes has been controlled. It is an important test that helps providers monitor and guide patients to minimize and avoid serious complications. In the map above:

  • Worse than the all-State gap means the gap in HbA1c testing between people with diabetes at low-income levels and people with diabetes at high-income levels is worse than the gap between these groups across all States with data.
  • Similar to the all-State gap means the gap in HbA1c testing between people with diabetes at low-income levels and people with diabetes at high-income levels is similar to the gap between these groups across all States with data.
  • Better than the all-State gap means the gap in HbA1c testing between people with diabetes at low-income levels and people with diabetes at high-income levels is better than the gap between these groups across all States with data.
  • Unknown/data insufficient means a measure for the State could not be made.
For 2007-2009, The Gap in HbA1c Testing for People with Diabetes and Low-Income (under $15,000) Compared to High-Income ($50,000 or more). The gap is worse than the all-State gap in the following States: District of Columbia, Massachusetts, Mississippi, New Jersey, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming. The gap is similar to the all-State gap in the following States: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin. The gap is better than the all-State gap in the following States: Arkansas, California, Delaware, Hawaii, Minnesota, Montana, Tennessee, and West Virginia. There is insufficient data for these States: Kansas, Maryland, Nebraska, New York, and Rhode Island.

These categories are based on comparisons of the relative rates of HbA1c testing for people with diabetes within the two income groups in each State relative to the all-State rates for those income groups, for the period 2007–2009. Data are from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. For more information, select Methods.

The chart below shows the rate at which HbA1c monitoring was done for people who are in low- or high-income groups within the State, the region, and all States.

Percent of People in Mississippi With Diabetes Who Had an HbA1c Test, by Income, 2007 to 2009.

Percent of People in Mississippi With Diabetes Who Had an HbA1c Test, by Income, 2007 to 2009.
Percent of People in Mississippi With Diabetes Who Had an HbA1c Test, by Income, 2007 to 2009. Bar chart. For low-income (under $15,000), the percentage in Mississippi is 76.9; the percentage in the East South Central States is 87.3; and the percentage in all States is 86.4. For high-income ($50,000 or more), the percentage in Mississippi is 94.3; the percentage in the East South Central States is 93.6; and the percentage in all States is 93.7.

The bar chart represents the percent of people with diabetes who had an HbA1c test in the previous 12 months for the period 2007–2009. Data are from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. For more information, select Methods.